Twitter Facebook Google RSS
 
National Defense > Blog > Posts > Coast Guard Expected to Scale Back Ambitious Ship Procurement Plans
Coast Guard Expected to Scale Back Ambitious Ship Procurement Plans
ARLINGTON, Va. — The U.S. Coast Guard will have to put up a bigger fight than expected to keep some of their prized ship programs alive.
 
Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Robert J. Papp asked shipbuilding industry representative at the the Surface Navy Association’s annual symposium for help in telling his story, which is one of out-of-commission icebreakers and aging cutters.
 
Papp said he is hopeful that the Coast Guard will get funding for eight National Security Cutters to replace 378-foot high-endurance cutters that have been in service since the 1960s. The third NSC was delivered to the Coast Guard last fall. Shortly after, the contract for the fifth was awarded to Huntington Ingalls Industries.
 
But Coast Guard officials say there is a real possibility that funding for the rest of the cutters could be taken away.
 
“I want to get all eight,” Papp said. “But each one’s going to be a challenge.”
 
National security cutters are likely to be in competition for money with the service’s Offshore Patrol Cutter. The Coast Guard wants to build 25 of these to replace medium-endurance cutters that are between 25 and 40 years old, some older.
 
The Coast Guard originally had planned for as many as 16 NSCs and 35 OPCs. Papp said this week that “we’re not going to get there.”
 
Interest in the offshore cutters may be outpacing that for the NSC, with the smaller ship being viewed as a more affordable option that shipyards can build faster. The Coast Guard says it could build two OPCs a year.
 
Analysts have begun suggesting that the service terminate the NSC and focus on building the OPCs, Papp said. But each time the Coast Guard conducts a fleet study, the results say it needs more ships, including ones that perform the functions of the National Security Cutter.
 
“I just think we’re going to need those large ships — the NSC — at some point in time,” Papp said. “We’re not building ships for next year or the next 10 years. We’re building ships for the next 40 years of this country.”

Comments

There are no comments yet for this post.
Items on this list require content approval. Your submission will not appear in public views until approved by someone with proper rights. More information on content approval.

Name: *

eMail *

Comment *

Title

Attachments

Name: *


eMail *


Comment *


 

Refresh
Please enter the text displayed in the image.
The picture contains 6 characters.

Characters *

  

Legal Notice *

NDIA is not responsible for screening, policing, editing, or monitoring your or another user's postings and encourages all of its users to use reasonable discretion and caution in evaluating or reviewing any posting. Moreover, and except as provided below with respect to NDIA's right and ability to delete or remove a posting (or any part thereof), NDIA does not endorse, oppose, or edit any opinion or information provided by you or another user and does not make any representation with respect to, nor does it endorse the accuracy, completeness, timeliness, or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement, or other material displayed, uploaded, or distributed by you or any other user. Nevertheless, NDIA reserves the right to delete or take other action with respect to postings (or parts thereof) that NDIA believes in good faith violate this Legal Notice and/or are potentially harmful or unlawful. If you violate this Legal Notice, NDIA may, in its sole discretion, delete the unacceptable content from your posting, remove or delete the posting in its entirety, issue you a warning, and/or terminate your use of the NDIA site. Moreover, it is a policy of NDIA to take appropriate actions under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and other applicable intellectual property laws. If you become aware of postings that violate these rules regarding acceptable behavior or content, you may contact NDIA at 703.522.1820.

 

 

Bookmark and Share